How To Use Spin Fishing Lures For Trout

Spin fishing lures are by far the most common choice for anglers when targeting trout species. All types of trout will accept spin fishing lures including spinner-baits, and these are often the preferred artificial bait compared to hard body lures and soft plastics.

In this article we will focus on the in-line spin fishing lures, rather than spinner-baits. In line spin fishing lures are a single metal shaft, up the top is a metal deflector to push water over the next attachment, a spoon.

The inline spin fishing lure's spoon is a metal disc that rotates extremely fast when retrieved at a certain speed, different spin fishing lures require a different speed to begin rotating.

 Spin lures were actually designed specifically for use on trout and salmon originally, so are the first and still by far the most successful lures for these fish. The main thing when using spin lures for trout is to have the correct fishing rod, the correct weight lure, and a bit of casting practice. As these lures are by far the easiest to use out of them all, it won't take long

Further down the hook is the body deflector, this creates a pressure system underneath the spoon for faster rotations. Then finally on the inline spin lure is the treble hook.

When fishing for trout using an inline spin lure, you need to ensure you are retrieving the lure at the correct speed for the highest spin effect, trout will not bother with your lure unless it is spinning extremely fast, hence some practice in shallower waters is needed beforehand to determine the rate at which you should retrieve.

 Once one is experienced with spin fishing lures, they will be able to determine whether the lure is spinning or not just from the feel and vibrations coming down the fishing line and into the rod.

Spin lures come in a range of different weights and sizes, while many new anglers will use higher weights to achieve a further casting distance, this is actually counter productive, larger weight heavy lures are normally only for marine use or extremely deep waters where a extremely fast sink rate is needed, along with a much larger looking bait.

Instead of opting for a higher weight to cast further, you should instead invest in a ultra light weight fishing rod designed for trout fishing. These will cater for lures between 1g and 4 grams ideally, with a maximum lure weight of 10 grams.

Ensure you invest in one that can handle 1 gram at minimum, as buying spin fishing lures from a fishing online store at these weights can often save a lot of money. With the correct rod, provided it can handle a 1 gram lure, there is no reason a 1 gram lure's cast distance will not reach just as far as a regular fishing rod with a 10 gram lure instead.

Trout fishing rods or ultra-light rods are by far the best choice, as is using lighter weight lures and casting these further. Using smaller and lower weight lures, ideally between 1.5 and 4.5 grams, will allow you to attract all the trout in the water, when fishing in a stream, a 1.5 gram lure is often enough to catch smaller trout hiding away.

 Where as in a large lake, you would preferably opt for a 4.5 gram lure which is larger and will be easier for fish further away to spot, without being too large as to deter them to strike.

The most common range of inline spin lures are called by names such as the Blue Fox Super Vibrax and Mepps style lures, however all spin lures operate the same way, they are designed as a cast and retrieve lure, with speed dictating the spinning of the lure's spoon.

Some fish will attack a lure which spins and is on full retrieve the entire time, other times however fish may prefer a short spin for around 1 second, then a pause, then a fast spin again, this fast retrieve then a pause allows the lure to sink in the water column, then retrieve brings it back towards the surface, hence creating a zig-zag motion in the water.

Fish are almost blind to the lure when it isn't spinning, so the sudden start and stop of the spin lure can provoke a hunting response in the fish, where it feels the baitfish is trying to get away.

So sometimes it can be best to do short spin motions, pause, spin then pause again, followed by a run for about 5 seconds a little slower, and repeat this process, this will draw attention of nearby fish, and the final run will provoke the predatory fish into a sense of being able to catch the fish, hence it will hunt down the lure and usually strike.

When fishing for salmon however, in salt water, the same tactics can be applied, however you will need a much larger lure, something like a 8 gram minimum to a 20 gram maximum, and your light weight trout rod also won't be capable of bringing in a sea trout / salmon, so a regular fishing rod is best for this.

 Fishing for salmon is great fun if they are available in your region, and often provide an experience much like trout fishing, with a lot more impact and fight to them.

The larger and heavier weight of these lures also help to cast further from the boat and also lets the lure sink deep a lot faster, getting a lure right to the bottom of the water column, you can retrieve on what would be about a 90 to 150 degree angle, hence when you pause, the lure will begin to sink almost straight down, you can allow the lure to stay under the water much longer this way, and rise and fall off the bottom of the water column until you find yourself a salmon.

Ted Thomas
 

Hi there, I'm Ted Thomas, an ardent adventure writer. I write for readers with a genuine interest in enjoying the great outdoors. By sharing my experiences camping, hunting and fishing, I hope to inspire others to fully explore the depths of their passion.

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